The Sum of Our Choices

The prevalence of cars in the American transportation landscape is not an issue of culture. It’s the result of historical accidents and individual choices.

The Cultural Identity of Europe

The European conflict between North and South did not arise out of nothing. Our civilization developed on a foundation of three cultures: first Cretan, then Athenian, then Christian. Rather than eclipsing each other in succession, these identities intermingle, continuing to battle it out today.

Driving up Costs

When we design our cities around cars and subsidize driving, we make life harder for poor residents. Not only does car-centric thinking divert attention and resources away from more affordable means of transportation, it takes up valuable space and makes housing more expensive for everyone.

Putting Pedestrians First

The demand for walkable neighborhoods is skyrocketing in the U.S. How are our communities rising to meet it?

The Muslim ‘No’

"There is no God but Allah". Islam is the only religion whose creed starts with such a negation. What is meant to deter nihilism, is really a double-edged sword.

How We Remember

Our nations and communities invest significantly in commemorating and memorializing the tragic events of our past. We hold events to mark anniversaries and erect physical monuments in our cities' most prominent locations. Why does honoring the past play such a great role our present, and how does th

Victims "Just Like Us"

We live in an era that memorializes like none before and seek to create memorials that allow visitors to identify with victims of tragedy. But in portraying victims as just like us, are we paying enough heed to the political and cultural factors that led them to be victims to begin with?

Greeks in Glass Houses

Given his focus on the atrocities of Germany’s past, Alexis Tsipras would do well to consider Greece’s own anti-Semitic history. After all, atoning for the past begins in one’s own backyard.

Unnecessary Scale

Present-day memorials have taken on dimensions like never before. They occupy considerable amounts of public space and serve a pedagogic mission. Yet, this focus on shared experiences and public education has betrayed memorials’ primary function: contemplative, private reflection.

Europe is Not a Museum

The “memory boom” has left Europe littered with monuments, so much so that when we’re not actively protesting them, we look right past them.

Site Sidebar

MOST COMMENTED

Communication Quarantine

Secretly checking emails, twittering from the restroom, online 24/7. How addicted to the "social media" phenomenon have we become? Markus Albert attempts to find out himself.

Google Almighty

Social media and Google are quickly becoming invaluable to our lives. By breaking with old structures, the little start-up emerged as the most dominant force of the Internet Age.

The Highlanders' Way

The Scottish National Party is governing from Edinburgh. Their central aim: independence from England. But this does not necessarily spell doom for the UK. Instead, we might see the emergence of new forms of partial sovereignty.

Tales from the Shire

The German federal government is relinquishing power to the EU in Brussels. Yet encouraged by the success of regional autonomy movements elsewhere, Bavarians want to bring politics back to Southern Germany - and closer to the people.

Moscow, Get Ready for Trouble

The long shadow of the Soviet Union can be felt even today. Around Russia, former republics and part-republics are experiencing turmoil across national and ethnic borders. If Moscow is not careful to play her cards right, destabilizing forces could soon become energized.

There is Always Room for Mysteries

Our understanding of the universe is continuously expanding. But every question that is solved only leads to new questions. Alexander Goerlach talked to Sir Martin Rees about astronomy, scientific certainty, and the role of religion in contemporary society.

Mobile Sliding Menu